HARTLEY, David (1732-1813). Letters on the American War. London: For Almon, Piccadilly; Kearseley, Fleet-Street; Dilly, Poultry; Crutwell, Bath; and Mullet, Bristol, 1778.

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HARTLEY, David (1732-1813). Letters on the American War. London: For Almon, Piccadilly; Kearseley, Fleet-Street; Dilly, Poultry; Crutwell, Bath; and Mullet, Bristol, 1778.

$3,600.00

Small folio, (10 ¼ x 8 ¼ inches). (Waterstaining along bottom margin throughout, old tape repair on pp. ii-1). Contemporary half red morocco, red cloth gilt (rear cover detached, front hinge starting, waterstaining, extremities worn).

Provenance: Introduction and each letter signed by the author.

Second edition, first published the same year. SIGNED by the author at the end of the introduction and after each letter. “In these letters Mr. Hartley endeavors to prove, that whatever pretexts may have been held out, coercion, and not reconciliation, was from the very first the secret and adopted plan, and this plan hath ever since been systematically and inflexibly pursued” (Sabin). “From 1774 to 1780 and from 1782-1784, Hartley represented Kingston upon Hull in Parliament. During this time, he expressed strong opposition to the war with America; his most famous pamphlet, ‘Letters on the American War’ [as here], accused Great Britain of tyranny over the colonies and proposed reconciliation between the two sides. Hartley was also a vigorous opponent of the African slave trade. Although a liberal on American policy, he was a long-time friend of Lord North and strongly disliked Shelburne; he supported the Coalition by voting against Shelburne’s peace preliminaries. Hartley was sent to Paris in April 1783, in order to assist in the negotiations that ended the war with the United States, to make a trade agreement. After 1784, Hartley retired from politics and dedicated himself increasingly to the study of mechanics and chemistry” (University of Michigan Library online). Howes H266. Sabin 30689.

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