BURR, David H. (1803-1875). An Atlas of the State of New York, Containing a Map of the State and of the Several Counties. Projected and Drawn by a Uniform Scale from...New York: David H. Burr, 1829 [1830].

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An Atlas of the State of New York, Containing a Map of the State and of the Several Counties. Projected and Drawn by a Uniform Scale from documents deposited in the Public Offices of the State… New York: David H. Burr, 1829 [1830].Large folio (21 ¾ x 16 ½ in.; 55.2 x 42 cm.). Half-title, engraved title-page with vignette "View of the Hudson near Fishkill", 52 fine engraved maps with original hand-colour in full, all mounted on guards, text in double columns (pages 17/18 "Internal Navigation" incorrectly bound between pages 10 and 11);  tape repair to four short marginal tears on half-title, fold title-page strengthened on verso with cloth tape with two short marginal repairs, some guards renewed and folds strengthened, some short marginal tears, occasionally with loss, a few scattered ink stains, occasional light foxing and offsetting. Modern half brown morocco over marbled boards by Vogel. 


RARE FIRST EDITION OF THE SECOND STATE ATLAS EVER TO HAVE BEEN PRODUCED IN THE UNITED STATES.  Elaborately drawn by Burr from the surveys conducted by the office of Surveyor General Simeon DeWitt, the atlas contains a map of the state, a large folding plan of New York City and single or double-page maps of each county along with many details such as towns, rivers, roads, railroads, and sometimes landowners.  All maps are dated 1829, however the atlas was published in 1830.


 "A LANDMARK DOCUMENT THAT CONSTITUTES ONE OF THE MOST PRECISE CARTOGRAPHIC RECORDS OF THE STATE. The Burr "Atlas " marks a major change. The whole state, the major city, each and every county is depicted in a uniform style and scale, with accompanying standardized statistical information and narrative. The state is given shape and form and substance in the atlas. All the counties are now joined together, a civil union is complete, all the land is subdivided, the marks of progress are recorded and celebrated. " (JohnRennie Short, Representing the Republic: Mapping the United States 1600-1900, pp. 85-88).                 

PROVENANCE:  A few plates with early manuscript annotations, "Map of the County of Hamilton" with three place-names erased.  REFERENCES: Howes B1017. Phillips, Atlases, 2206. Walter Ristow, American Maps & Mapmakers: Commercial Cartography in the 19th Century, pp. 103-108. Sabin 19873.    # 72lib291