CHÉRUBIN d’Orléans . La dioptrique oculaire, ou la theorique, la positive, et la mechanique, de l'oculaire dioptrique en toutes ses especes. Paris: Chez Thomas Jolly & Simon Benard, 1671.

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CHÉRUBIN d’Orléans . La dioptrique oculaire, ou la theorique, la positive, et la mechanique, de l'oculaire dioptrique en toutes ses especes. Paris: Chez Thomas Jolly & Simon Benard, 1671.


Folio (13 ½ x 9 in.; 34.5 x 23 cm): [48], 419, [31] pages (first leaf blank, but this copy lacking the final blank leaf), engraved allegorical half-title page by Gerard Edelinck based on an original work by Jean le Pautre, two engraved illustrations on pp. [1] and 16, and 57 numbered engraved plates (1 folded, and 5 on double-pages), several of which are re-numbered in ink in contemporary hand; several gatherings quite browned and spotted, including a few containing plates. Bound in contemporary full parchment over boards, title in ink on spine; wear to parchment on corners of front and back boards and spine, with some losses.

ORIGINAL EDITION OF THIS STANDARD 17TH CENTURY WORK ON OPTICS. "This is the
standard work of optics of the 17th century . [Chérubin d Orléans] is the inventor of the opera glasses, which here figures together with other optical inventions. He describes the grinding of lenses and the plates illustrate every aspect of a lens maker's workshop" (Duncan). According to Albert, "[The Dioptrique is] this is “the most exhaustive treatise on lens making in the seventeenth century”.

This six-hundred page long folio is a comprehensively and cogently-argued treatise on telescope making. It contains an impressive amount of theoretical, practical, and first-hand information on all of its facets -- from explanations of the telescope’s working principles, to descriptions of lens grinding and polishing, to rules for the right distances between lenses, to methods to find the right apertures, to descriptions of the shapes and articulations of the wooden parts and bolts and screws needed to properly point a telescope to the skies, to the construction of tubes, and so on and so forth." Chérubin d Orléans also includes detailed descriptions of the effects that different lenses have on the eye and his observations of the stars and the moon made through the telescopes of his own invention.

PROVENANCE: ca. early 20th century printed label of Libreria Antiquaria Machiavelli and unidentified late 19th or early 20th century bookplate with initials "L P N". REFERENCES: Daniel M. Albert et al., Source Book of Ophthalmology (1995), 412; Duncan 2360; Krivatsy-NLM, 2427; Poggendorff I, 430; Wellcome II, 335. # 72JFP052