J.T. Lloyd. Lloyd's Official Map of the State of Virginia. New York, 1861.

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Lloyd, J.T.

Lloyd's Official Map of the State of Viriginia

Engraving with original hand color in full.

New York: J.T. Lloyd, 1861.

31 1/2 x 51 inches

 

Popular Civil War Era Map of Virginia 

Nice example of the 1861 edition of JT Lloyd's large map of Virginia, the most widely distributed and influential map of Virginia during the Civil War period.

Lloyd's map of Virginia is often referred to as the reduced edition of Herman Boye's seminal map of Virginia, which Lloyd credits as the map's source. First issued in 1861, the map was perhaps the most successful of all of Lloyd's separately issued maps, which included maps of the US, Mississippi River, Georgia and Tennessee.

Lloyd's map is colored by county and includes marvelous detail throughout, including a number of interesting annotations. There were at least 4 other states of Lloyd map, including an 1872 edition by Wynkoop & Hallenbeck, with the Lynchburg overprinting.

The present example includes a testimonial for the St. Nicholas Hotel in New York:

Completed six years ago, and universally pronounced the most magnificent, convenient and thoroughly organized establishment of its kind on this continent.  It is without rival in size, in sumptuousness, and in the general elements of comfort.  This Hotel has accommodations for 1000 guests.

The St. Nicholas Hotel was a 600-room, mid-nineteenth century luxury hotel on Broadway in the neighborhood of SoHo in Manhattan. It opened on January 6, 1853, and by the end of the year had expanded to 1,000 rooms.  The St. Nicholas raised the bar for a new standard of lavish appointments for a luxury hotel.  It was the first New York City building to cost over $1 million.  The evening of November 25, 1864, the hotel was involved in a terrorist attack by the so-called Confederate Army of Manhattan, that is, Confederate saboteurs who thought they would set fire to New York City. The St. Nicholas was one of more than a dozen of the finest New York hotels set afire.  Other hotels included Astor House and the Metropolitan Hotel. The attempt was ill-conceived and badly executed. The fires largely self-extinguished due to a lack of oxygen; they were set in locked rooms, the technology was not well-developed, and the terrorists were intent on making their own escape

In all, we noted more than a dozen variant states of the map, mostly involving changing text entries around the title.

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